If you give a college student a donut: Flash UX for academic museums

Demonstration

Friday, April 03, 2020: 12:45pm - 1:45pm -

Abigail Shelton, University of Notre Dame , USA

If you give a college student a donut, she might give you some website feedback. This fall, one campus art museum staffer and one library faculty member from the University of Notre Dame took to the busy library concourse and museum atrium for five weeks to offer donuts to passersby in exchange for feedback on the prototype site. Over the course of five weeks, we talked to around 175 students, faculty, and staff from departments as diverse as Chemical Engineering to Theology to Architecture to Computer Science. We asked them to comment on the homepage layout, perform simple searches, suggest new metadata fields, work with a IIIF Mirador image viewer, and try out the personalized collections feature. This demonstration will cover how we structured the activity and what we found. It will also briefly touch on how this simple and inexpensive exercise has encouraged a wider acceptance of user experience thinking in both the library and museum. 

Bibliography:
Chao, Z. (2019). Rethinking user experience studies in libraries: The story of UX Café. Weave: Journal of Library User Experience, 2(2). http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/weave.12535642.0002.203.

Hicks, W, Phillips, M., & Andrews, P. (2019, June). Building interfaces for all the users. Talk presented at Open Repositories 2019, Hamburg, Germany. https://www.conftool.net/or2019/index.php?page=browseSessions&form_session=343#paperID502.

Villaespesa, E., & Tankha, M. (2019, April). The Met's object page: Towards a new synthesis of scholarship and storytelling. Talk presented at Museums and the Web 2019, Boston, MA. https://mw19.mwconf.org/paper/the-mets-object-page-towards-a-new-synthesis-of-scholarship-and-storytelling/.

Wilkinson, J. (2015). Low-hanging fruit and pain points: An analysis of change implementation from flash usability testing at Duke University Libraries. (Unpublished Master's thesis). University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. https://doi.org/10.17615/qf0w-x697.